3D Metal Printing VELO3D signs agreement with CRP Meccanica for distributorship in Europe

Editor: Barbara Schulz

Italy/Europe – Modena-based CRP Meccanica, an industry-leader in the field of high-precision CNC machining, now offers after-sales support, service, maintenance, and production-phase backup for Velo3D’s advanced additive manufacturing systems in Italy and Europe.

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With Metal 3D Printing Italian CRP Meccanica has signed a distributorship agreement with Velo3D for the Italian and European market.
With Metal 3D Printing Italian CRP Meccanica has signed a distributorship agreement with Velo3D for the Italian and European market.
(Source: CRP Meccanica)

RP Meccanica has signed an agreement with US-based VELO3D to be an exclusive distributor for the company's advanced support-free TM Metal 3D printing systems in the Italian market. It is also empowered to sell the equipment in some other parts of Europe on an account basis, as well as provide after-sales support, service, maintenance, and production backup to customers throughout the region.

“We are creating a revolution in manufacturing technology," Franco Cevolini, president and CTO of CRP Meccanica says. "The experience and credibility the whole world recognises in CRP Meccanica will help VELO transform the Italian and European metal 3D printing market. We are ready to embrace this new cutting-edge technology, combining it with the expertise gained over 50 years of activity serving the most demanding industrial sectors and delivering extraordinary results.”

VELO’s laser powder bed fusion systems, such as the flagship Sapphire 3D printer, are said to be unique in that they feature the company’s proprietary Support-Free technology. The technique allows engineers and designers to escape from the constraints of Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) practices, enabling part designs with support-free horizontal overhangs and cavities. In contrast, most comparable industrial metal 3D printers require support structures on overhangs shallower than about 45°, placing a cap on true geometric freedom.

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