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Xjet MTC invests to bolster ceramic AM capabilities

Editor: Steffen Donath

The Carmel AM system will enable production of premium quality end-use parts with complex geometries.

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The Xjet Carmel 1400C will provide ceramic AM capabilities for MTC clients and members.
The Xjet Carmel 1400C will provide ceramic AM capabilities for MTC clients and members.
(Source: Xjet)

Xjet Ltd. has announced today that the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), will add Xjet NanoParticle Jetting technology to its portfolio of additive manufacturing (AM) technologies at its facility in Coventry, UK. Determined that the global Coronavirus pandemic will not slow progress, the Carmel system has been shipped to MTC and is scheduled to go live in the coming few months.

According to Dr Tom Wasley, MTC Senior Research Engineer, Xjet successfully demonstrated the ability of the Carmel 1400C in producing premium end-use ceramic parts and scaling up for production, thus making the machine an ideal addition to its existing AM capability.

Wasley explains, “Xjet’s NanoParticle Jetting technology delivers very high-density parts, so users can have confidence in the materials. Designers often feel the need to ‘overengineer’ AM parts for basic applications, for instance using thicker walls so parts are less fragile, because they are using AM materials, not the real thing, but this is not the case with Xjet. In addition, the large build platform, the lack of interaction with powders and no extra step needed for debinding, scaling up for volume production is easily achievable with minimal time and labour.”

Quizzed on the capabilities of the new Xjet system, Wasley says, “The surface finish that can be achieved with Xjet is arguably very hard to replicate with any other kind of additive process. It also provides a means to make small, intricate and extremely detailed parts.”

MTC’s Carmel 1400C system will enable the manufacture of ceramic parts that are highly complex. Components will feature superfine details, smooth surfaces and pinpoint accuracy — making the promise of zero-cost complexity a reality.

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