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Renishaw / Formnext 2018 High productivity with additive manufacturing, allowing no compromise on quality

Editor: Briggette Jaya

UK-based global engineering company Renishaw will showcase its Ren AM 500Q, a pioneering four-laser system, which raises productivity, while decreasing cost-per-part, without compromising on quality.

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The Ren AM 500Q boasts melt-pool and laser power monitoring capabilities to provide evidence of melting behaviour in real-time.
The Ren AM 500Q boasts melt-pool and laser power monitoring capabilities to provide evidence of melting behaviour in real-time.
(Source: Renishaw)

At Formnext, Renishaw will showcase its Ren AM 500Q, a pioneering four-laser system with precision dynamic focussing and a full-field view of the powder bed. Launched in 2017, the Ren AM 500Q raises productivity, while decreasing cost-per-part in commonly used platform sizes, the company says. Tests and analysis have shown that multiple lasers can operate independently on separate parts or co-operate on a single, large component without diminishing the quality of the material produced. As such, multi-laser additive manufacturing has opened up new product design opportunities for a range of industries as the technology becomes more accessible. The benefits of multiple lasers require file preparation and simulation tools.

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The company will also demonstrate the latest version of its Quant AM build-preparation software, which has laser assignment tools that enable users to develop processing strategies in line with the quality and productivity demands of their applications.

Renishaw explained that when multiple lasers are in close proximity, there is the potential that emissions from one laser could affect another depending on their relative position within the machine’s inert gas flow. “The first generation of multi-laser machines used zoning to avoid this issue, combined with either linear or divergent gas flow,” Marc Saunders, director of Global Solutions Centres at Renishaw noted. He explained further that this method, however, has several drawbacks including reduced productivity for non-symmetrical builds, discontinuities as a result of thermal drift in the optical systems and varying melting conditions as a result of divergent gas flow. Saunders added: “The design of Renishaw’s RenAM 500Q overcomes these drawbacks and enables efficient use of all four lasers.”

The machine boasts melt-pool and laser power monitoring capabilities to provide evidence of melting behaviour in real-time. The machine performance is said to be consistent and Renishaw offers guidelines to enable customers to produce high-integrity components in a productive and flexible way.

At the show, Saunders will be presenting a talk on how to radically improve productivity with multi-laser systems, without compromising on product quality at the TCT introducing stage on Tuesday, 13 November (11:30-11:45).

Renishaw will be in Hall 3.1, Booth E68.

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