Additive Manufacturing 3D printer enables rapid transition from prototyping to production parts

Editor: Doris Popp

Design and engineering business CALLUM can swiftly produce low volume, bespoke production parts in-house for its limited-edition Aston Martin CALLUM Vanquish 25, thanks to the capabilities of the MakerBot METHOD X.

Related Companies

Design and engineering business CALLUM can swiftly produce low volume, bespoke production parts in-house for its limited-edition Aston Martin CALLUM Vanquish 25, thanks to the capabilities of the MakerBot METHOD X.
Design and engineering business CALLUM can swiftly produce low volume, bespoke production parts in-house for its limited-edition Aston Martin CALLUM Vanquish 25, thanks to the capabilities of the MakerBot METHOD X.
(Source: MakerBot)

Two decades after it was first penned, the Aston Martin Vanquish’s revered designer, Ian Callum CBE, has retold the model for today’s GT driver, combining performance with usability. Utilising advances in materials and technologies, including additive manufacturing, over 350 design and engineering updates have been made to create this contemporary edition, the Aston Martin CALLUM Vanquish 25.

While the iconic lines remain, the Vanquish has been refined to create a more purposeful look and give it more power from its 5.9-litre V12 engine. It sits lower and wider, with revised suspension setup for a sharper ride, while also benefiting from the latest technologies, such as 3D printed brake ducts that feed cool air to the new carbon ceramic brakes, which bring stopping power right up to date.

Throughout the design and development process of the Aston Martin CALLUM Vanquish 25, CALLUM’s design and engineering teams have been using the MakerBot METHOD X™ 3D printer to promptly produce functional prototypes for proof of concept and stringent testing. But with the materials and finish capabilities of the METHOD X, the team is able to go one step further and create production parts in-house, something that it wasn’t capable of achieving previously.

CALLUM is using METHOD X to produce the vehicle’s brake ducts, the screen mounting devices and switch gear mounting brackets, and an intricate mounting mechanism that houses a removeable Bremont watch in the dashboard.

“Additive manufacturing has come a long way in the past ten, even five, years. The resolution of such machines is much better, allowing us to create intricate products with a high standard of finish that wouldn’t have been possible before,” explains Adam Donfrancesco, engineering director at CALLUM. “Traditionally, these parts would have been machined from billet aluminium, or created via injection moulding. These methods are expensive, time-intensive and often reliant on third-party suppliers. You may be waiting some time for a small, low volume part to be produced and when it arrives it doesn’t meet our exacting requirements – when you’re working on such a prestige vehicle as an Aston Martin, and at the level of refinement we are, everything has to be absolutely precise.”

Watch the video here.

(ID:47714907)