Machine Tool Industry Major projects boost mid-year figures to a healthy level

Editor: Barbara Schulz

Germany – The German machine tool industry is in good shape. According to the German Machine Tool Buiders' Association, order bookings rose by 16% in Q2 2016 compared to Q2 2015, and employment remains at a high level.

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Acording to VDW Executive Director Dr Wilfried Schäfer, the higher level of demand results primarily from good domestic business, and in particular from automotive projects in China and Mexico.
Acording to VDW Executive Director Dr Wilfried Schäfer, the higher level of demand results primarily from good domestic business, and in particular from automotive projects in China and Mexico.
(Source: VDW)

Domestic machine tool orders were up by 19%, while demand from abroad increased by 14%, the German association announced today. The eurozone contributed growth of 37%, and non-eurozone nations a 10% rise in orders. Order bookings for the first half of the year increased by a substantial 12% compared to the same period last year, VDW said. While domestic orders rose by 10%, orders from abroad were also up (+13%).

“Our business is running significantly better than we expected at the beginning of the year. The sector can point to a sound, balanced performance over the year’s first half,” commented Dr Wilfried Schäfer, executive director of the sectoral organisation VDW (German Machine Tool Builders’ Association) in Frankfurt am Main.

The higher level of demand results primarily from good domestic business, and in particular from automotive projects in China and Mexico, he added. With regards to the first half of 2016, one-off effects are primarily responsible for the auspicious order situation. Abroad, machining centres and milling machines are benefiting particularly from large-scale orders.

All other metal-cutting technologies, plus significant areas of forming technology, however, are performing less well in terms of non-domestic orders from abroad. In Germany, by contrast, the picture is somewhat different, Schäfer said. “Metal cutting is 2% up, and the current as-is situation gives reason to hope that a broad spectrum of technologies can benefit from this.”

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