Grinding Technology Australian machine tool maker opens new European headquarters in Germany

Editor: Barbara Schulz

Australia/Germany - Australian grinding machine manufacturer Anca formally opened its new state-of-the-art European headquarters in Weinheim, Germany, on 11 June 2015.

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Australian Ambassador David Ritchie, company founder Pat Boland and Europe's GM Jan Langfelder revealing plaque for new European headquarters.
Australian Ambassador David Ritchie, company founder Pat Boland and Europe's GM Jan Langfelder revealing plaque for new European headquarters.
(Source: Anca)

Anca’s new customer-focussed facility is close to the previous location in Mannheim, Germany and involved an investment of over €4m, the company said.

As Jan Langfelder, General Manager of Europe advised “the expansion was necessary in order to keep up with our growth and to ensure we continue to offer good service and spare part deliveries in Europe. After helping set up the first German office in 1991 it is rewarding to see the continual investment and growth in this core region.”

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Official guests, His Excellency Mr David Ritchie, AO, the Australian Ambassador to Germany, and the Deputy Mayor of Weinheim, Dr. Torsten Fetzner, spoke at the event which included tours of the technology centre, demonstration room, comprehensive spare parts store and service area. Ritchie expressed his delight at the opportunity to open a facility that showed such a large Australian investment in Germany by a successful Australian company.

The day was also attended by co-founder and Chairman of the Board Pat Boland and his family, and CEO Grant Anderson. Boland told the 200 invited guests that he felt Anca was in an important industry as the major eras of history are measured in terms of their cutting tool technology, through the stone, bronze, copper ages and today.

He shared that “the Anca philosophy is to push in two different directions, one being engineering excellence, with 25 PhDs working in our R&D centre and close co-operation with universities around the world. The other dimension is practical trade skills. Machine tools have to be built ruggedly, they have to be reliable and easy to use for someone with a trade background. I think that push from an academic sense and a trade sense has been one of our important cultural features.”

In addition to the formal proceedings, the day included technical demonstrations, tours and lunch. An Open House was held on the following day to welcome more customers to see the new facility and machines.

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