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Stratasys Acquisitions, developments fuel growth at 3D printing giant; metal next?

Editor: Eric Culp

Company expands into prosumer market and eyes metal 3D printing.

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Jonathan Cobb, executive vice president corporate marketing, sees huge potential in the prosumer market, but jigs and fixtures are also on the rise.
Jonathan Cobb, executive vice president corporate marketing, sees huge potential in the prosumer market, but jigs and fixtures are also on the rise.
(Photo: Schulz)

The last Euromold saw Stratasys just weeks before closing the Objet merger deal. According to CEO David Reis, the combined company is already seeing results.

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The merger went faster than anticipated with the completion of the reseller cross training with over 100 partners and approx. 600 sales reps. Reis also looked back at another successful acquisition: In August 2013, the company completed the merger with Makerbot, which was founded in 2009 and has built the largest installed base of 3D desktop printers, focusing on the so-called prosumer market.

“Part of our strategy is to lead the desktop market and continue growing organically and via mergers and acquisitions,” Reis said during a press conference on Tuesday at Euromold in Frankfurt, Germany.

Jonathan Cobb, executive vice president of corporate marketing, agreed. “We are investing nine to ten per cent of our revenue in R&D, and we are in a position that will allow us to do some additional acquisitions. The growth is two-fold: organic and inorganic. There is no technology or material that would be off limits to look at.”

While Cobb wouldn’t comment on any plans in regard to expanding the business with 3D metal printing technology, Stratasys Chairman Scott Crump confirmed in an interview with Bloomberg that Stratasys had an organic project to get into additive metal.

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