Formnext 2015 3D printing increasingly attractive for machine tool builders

Author / Editor: Thomas Masuch / Barbara Schulz

Germany - EOS founder Dr. Hans J. Langer registers sustained growth in additive technologies and expects traditional machine tools manufacturers to increasingly enter into these alternative manufacturing processes. The EOS CEO will hold a keynote at the Formnext conference on the subject of future developments in additive methods.

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Ergonomic and trendy: Prior to the Formnext 2015, Uwe Behm (left), General Manager of Messe Frankfurt, visits EOS in Krailling to explore the great possibilities additive manufacturing offers for the industry. Udo Behrendt, Key Account Manager Aerospace at EOS, presents a plastic component manufactured with 3D printing that is used by EOS in its own facilities.
Ergonomic and trendy: Prior to the Formnext 2015, Uwe Behm (left), General Manager of Messe Frankfurt, visits EOS in Krailling to explore the great possibilities additive manufacturing offers for the industry. Udo Behrendt, Key Account Manager Aerospace at EOS, presents a plastic component manufactured with 3D printing that is used by EOS in its own facilities.
(Bild: Zikomm)

"The biggest challenge for additive technologies is getting designers to shift their thinking," says Dr. Hans J. Langer, founder and CEO of the global technology and quality leader in high end solutions in additive manufacturing (AM). To support this process, EOS has so-called application consulting teams that support customers during the introduction and implementation of these new procedures. For example, this would include identifying the proper application for the use of additive manufacturing.

New products push additive manufacturing forward

Currently, the design of many components, for example in aircraft construction, is optimized for the efficient use of conventional production methods, like casting and milling. Here Langer sees great potential for additive technology, particularly with the introduction of new products and models. This is because additive technology offers great freedom in design and thus opens up completely new possibilities for optimized and/or entirely new applications and products.

Langer founded EOS in 1989 and has developed the company into a fast growing global player (see box). Langer also holds interests in other businesses around Munich, among others in laser technology companies.

Despite their open mentality, EOS are also very protective of their sensitive technology. In their state of the art headquarters in Krailling, long corridors are lined by secured rooms which only the respective development teams are allowed to access. With the current hype surrounding this technology, the company must protect its know-how. EOS also knows the occasional patent dispute, which is viewed as a further indicator of how competitive this market currently is.

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